Roseanne Reid. Trails. Last Man Records

americana-roseanne-reid-trails-250x250A long standing favourite on the Scots live music scene,  Roseanne Reid at long last delivers her much anticipated debut album which she spoke about when Blabber’n’Smoke interviewed her back in October 2017. It’s fair to say that Trails is probably the most anticipated album of the year so far with Reid’s dedicated fans (and there are many) waiting with bated breath for its arrival, perhaps with fingers crossed that it would meet their high expectations. It’s also fair to say that Reid has probably surpassed their expectations as Trails is a magnificent album with many songs familiar from her live shows and single releases given a wonderful treatment from her producer Teddy Thompson. One of the many delights of the album is to hear these songs dressed in their Sunday finery after spending so much time in their company accompanied only by Reid’s guitar.

The song arrangements are tastefully done with Reid’s voice given space front and centre as is only right. She’s a great singer, her voice tastefully worn and weary, perfectly suited for her songs which are primarily in an Americana idiom. There are elements of blues, soul, country and folk folded into the mix with some songs given a full band arrangement while others feature Reid and her guitar with minimal embellishments. As for the songs, well, Reid’s been writing songs since she was inspired by Martha Wainwright, whom she saw in concert aged only 12, and then discovering Steve Earle a few years later. Earle’s played a role as a mentor of sort for Reid ever since she attended his first song writing boot camp (a 21st birthday present from her family) and he has repeatedly invited her back. A measure of his regard is his appearance on Sweet Annie where he sings harmony with Reid, a real feather in the cap for a girl from Leith. Anyhow, Reid has blossomed into an excellent writer, able to spin a tale or spill her heart out in a couple of verses.

The album opens with Amy, a very familiar song to those who know Ms. Reid but with its brief piano accompaniment a taste of what she has conjured up in the studio with Thompson to flesh out her sound. Heading North goes the whole shebang as the band serve up a wonderfully mellow Muscle Shoals like sound with piano, organ, guitar and female harmonies all surrounding her southern soul voice as she fully inhabits a song which recalls the likes of Lucinda Williams and Jackson Browne. The south beckons also on I Love Her So which, which with its horn arrangement, sounds like a lost deep soul cut from the bowels of Stax studios but elsewhere Reid delves into a very sweet and melodic country rock sound. There’s the shuffling rhythms of Hey River with its intricate drum patterns and sly slide guitar and on It Is You she harvests the sound of Dylan and The Band goofing around in their basement. Take It From Me is a soft shoe shuffle reminiscent of Van Morrison’s lighter side while Me Oh My is actually a bit of a rocker with the band whipping up a bit of a storm. The sublime Out In Space starts off as it is another song suffused with the spirit of the American south but instead Reid sings in her native Scots accent here. As the band swoon around her with a delicate tapestry of guitar and organ, Reid paints a metaphysical portrait tingling with an aura of mysticism and longing, a perfect example of what some folk might call Caledonian soul.

Getting back to basics, Reid, her guitar and voice, are central to the more stripped down songs here. Sweet Annie, a sparsely worded miniature love song is just wonderful as Steve Earle adds his voice to Reid’s while a melancholic violin weeps across the delicate fingerpicking. Reid’s pin perfect capture of  love and loss on Levi, a song which recalls no less a figure than Townes Van Zandt, is also embellished by evocative string playing but it’s on the closing song, What I’ve Done, where Reid really shows what she’s capable of. A skeletal banjo repeats her guitar lines as she roams into American gothic territory sounding for all the world like the late Karen Dalton.

Trails is an absurdly accomplished achievement for a debutante singer songwriter and if there’s any justice it should be in the running for all sorts of awards and gongs as the year goes on.

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