The Goat Roper Band. Tall Grass. Old Pup Records

gr-tall-grass-album-cover-front-250x250Tall Grass, the third album from Welsh “Cosmic Country Blues” trio, The Goat Ropers, finds the band in fine form with a swell collection of songs which allow their fairly unique line up of two guitars and a double bass to shine. Singer Sam Roberts’ voice can take some time to bed in but it actually fits the loose limbed and occasionally ramshackled approach the band take as they root around various varieties of roots music. At times they can be quite forceful, driving a song along with a powerful punch. Elsewhere, they can wander endearingly through an eccentric melody like a band of hippies in search of the lost chord.

Produced by Romeo Stodart of The Magic Numbers and with the trio – Roberts along with brothers Jim and Tom Davies on guitar and double bass respectively – augmented on a couple of numbers by organ, pedal steel and banjo, the album kicks off with a bang. Unwrap My Bones is a fine example of a parched desert number, not too dissimilar from the early days of Calexico. Roberts is finely deadpan as he sings over a perfectly assembled arrangement of strummed guitars, lonesome harmonica, swelling organ and sweet pedal steel. It’s a great start and they remain in the badlands with their fine mix of Tex-Mex border romance and doo-wop on Desert Flower before unwrapping the dizzying layers of Main Street which flits between a Beatles’ like melody and some shit kicking southern rock with snaking guitars funnelling away.

When the double bass starts to thump away at the beginning of High Heel Blues you know you’re in for a ride as the band whizz through a hi-octane number verging on rockabilly but it’s the only song here where they really let their hair down. Elsewhere, they delve into the country blues aspect of their self styled description. Keep On is one of those songs which just drifts along with a honeysuckle perfume in its trail while I Can’t Fly, featuring some sly guitar lines from Jim Davies, starts off with a laid back nonchalance before a degree of anxiety creeps in. Anyway Anyhow snaps and snarls with a good old fashioned jug band feel (along with a sniff of a neurotic Lovin’ Spoonful) and that old time swing continues in the sing along,  Ask For Alice,  which sounds tailor made for audience participation in a live setting. And just as they opened the album with a belter, they close with one, albeit in a totally different idiom. Don’t Mind The Rain is a meandering number which is spiked with atmospheric guitar notes over an organ backdrop with the harmonies soaked in a psychedelic haze. It sounds a little bit as if The Pretty Things had recorded SF Sorrow on psilocybin in an Arizona desert. Odd but weirdly compelling.

Good news is that The Goat Roper Band are currently touring and they are in Scotland this week playing shows with Hannah Aldridge in Stirling, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdour. All dates here.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s